Tag Archives: fieldwork

The Construction of Anthropological Knowledge and the Construction of Research

To mark the publication of the newest ethnography in the Teaching Culture series, Merchants in the City of Art: Work, Identity, and Change in a Florentine Neighborhood, the author, Anne Schiller, provides some background on how she involved student researchers in her ethnographic fieldwork. read more…

  • dateApril 15, 2016
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  • posted byAnne Schiller
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Ancestral Lines, Second Edition

At the core of the Teaching Culture series of ethnographies is John Barker’s Ancestral Lines: The Maisin of Papua New Guinea and the Fate of the Rainforest. This book has been tremendously successful in college and university classrooms because of its beautiful writing, its clear organization, and because it does not talk down to or bore students. This week, the book is available in a new edition, and we asked John Barker, the author and editor of the Teaching Culture series, to say a few words about its publication and the history behind the book. read more…

  • dateApril 4, 2016
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  • posted byJohn Barker
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Taking Risks in Teaching Anthropology, Part I

This is the first of a two-part blog post in which Suzanne Z. Gottschang from Smith College outlines the benefits of integrating a real-world assignment into her introductory cultural anthropology course. read more…

  • dateFebruary 3, 2016
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  • posted bySuzanne Z. Gottschang
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Announcing ethnoGRAPHIC: A New Series

Well, we’re just about finished our Graphic Adventures in Anthropology, and now that we have you primed, we’re thrilled to announce a new book series here at the University of Toronto Press called ethnoGRAPHIC: Ethnography in Graphic Form. Whether you are an aspiring artist, or just interested in the possibilities of this format as both a methodology and a unique way of communicating your research results, we welcome expressions of interest and discussions about potential collaborations. It’s a brave new world out there, and we’re convinced that many academics want to be more creative in how they reach their audiences. We hope this series will harness some of that creativity. read more…

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Fieldwork Cartoons Revisited

In 1989 when conducting fieldwork in Masset, Haida Gwaii, I complemented my standard social anthropological toolkit of camera, cassette tapes (before the days of digital), and field notebooks with a small black sketchbook—my cartoon book. This proved to be a rewarding and useful means to tell an immediate story about fieldwork, drawn late at night, and before any photographs could be developed. I used the cartoons to start conversations with Haida community members, and we shared perspectives on the events I depicted—from the ordinary to the celebratory. read more…

  • dateMarch 23, 2015
  • comments1
  • posted byGillian Crowther
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