The Power of Two

Well, we’re now officially toddlers. It’s been two fun, stressful, sometimes frustrating, and often exhilarating years of the Teaching Culture blog. And I’m hoping that given the speed of life online we’re actually older than we appear (has anyone worked out the online years vs. human years equation yet?). We came at this as book people, not bloggers, so we don’t claim any expertise about blogging or tweeting, and like any toddler, we have a lot to learn about pacing ourselves. But even if the road ahead is filled with challenges, we also know that we’ve come a long way. We’ve gone from zero to being able to walk (running is another matter), and I think we may even be starting to find our voice(s) as well. So we’re taking a few moments out to celebrate where we’ve been before we sharpen the focus on where we are headed, and what we still want to accomplish. read more…

  • dateNovember 17, 2014
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  • posted byAnne
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A Teacher’s Review of Ancestral Lines: The Maisin of Papua New Guinea and the Fate of the Rainforest

I have taught Ancestral Lines: The Maisin of Papua New Guinea and the Fate of the Rainforest by John Barker every semester since it came out in 2008. Without hesitation, it is my favourite teaching ethnography. Allow me to share with you how I teach with it… read more…

  • dateNovember 11, 2014
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  • posted byThomas McIlwraith
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Teaching Philosophies

This is the second in a new series of blog postings by the Anthropology Teaching Forum (ATF) at the University of Texas, San Antonio. This post offers a recap of a recent discussion on teaching philosophies—what they are, how they are defined, and how they inform different teaching styles—hosted by the ATF. read more…

  • dateOctober 30, 2014
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  • posted byLeah McCurdy
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The Anthropology Teaching Forum (ATF)

This post marks the beginning of a collaboration with the Anthropology Teaching Forum (ATF) at the University of Texas, San Antonio. Here, graduate student Leah McCurdy describes how the ATF was born and outlines its lofty goals. For those of you who aren’t lucky enough to have such an engaged teaching culture in your department, the ATF has been kind enough to share summaries of past talks in this post and future talks in future posts. read more…

  • dateOctober 24, 2014
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  • posted byLeah McCurdy
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Sharing Syllabi: Anthropology of the Internet (Updated)

Last year, we shared the syllabus for a great new course at the University of New Hampshire: Anthropology of the Internet, taught by Svetlana Peshkova, Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology. This course has changed substantially since it was first offered, and we are pleased to be able to share an updated syllabus… read more…

  • dateOctober 16, 2014
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  • posted byAnna
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