Search Results for: graphic adventures in anthropology

Coding Culture III: Four More (Advanced) Hacks for the Digital Anthropology Classroom

This is the third post in a multi-part blog series in which Katherine Cook shares her experiences integrating digital anthropology into her teaching. In this entry, she offers up four more advanced hacks to develop more complex assignments. read more…

  • dateApril 20, 2017
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  • posted byKatherine Cook
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Coding Culture II: Four Hacks to Digitize Your Anthropology Classroom

This is the second post in a multi-part blog series in which Katherine Cook shares her experiences integrating digital anthropology into her teaching. She outlines a series of platforms and assignments that she has tested in undergraduate courses. They are flexible enough to cut, spruce, and duct tape into any anthropological application. read more…

  • dateMarch 13, 2017
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  • posted byKatherine Cook
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2016: Trends in Teaching, Publishing, and Anthropology

2015 was a bit of blur for me. I spent the bulk of the year in a post-concussive haze. Thankfully, our team pulled in some great syllabi to share with you, and we relied on experienced instructors to offer us interesting classroom activities. We even corralled a more artsy group of anthropologists to take us on Graphic Adventures in Anthropology. We hope to build on that this coming year, and are kicking things off with our Top Ten Trends for 2016. It’s a strange list perhaps—an intersection of teaching, publishing, and anthropology—and one you might not see elsewhere, but we hope you find some value in it. read more…

  • dateJanuary 19, 2016
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  • posted byAnne
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Announcing ethnoGRAPHIC: A New Series

Well, we’re just about finished our Graphic Adventures in Anthropology, and now that we have you primed, we’re thrilled to announce a new book series here at the University of Toronto Press called ethnoGRAPHIC: Ethnography in Graphic Form. Whether you are an aspiring artist, or just interested in the possibilities of this format as both a methodology and a unique way of communicating your research results, we welcome expressions of interest and discussions about potential collaborations. It’s a brave new world out there, and we’re convinced that many academics want to be more creative in how they reach their audiences. We hope this series will harness some of that creativity. read more…

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Teaching Comics in a Medical Anthropology and Humanities Class

True or false: Stick figures effectively convey complex emotions and experiences.

If you were to ask me this question a year ago, I would have confidently replied “false.” That was before I stumbled across Allie Brosh’s web comic “Hyperbole and a Half.” Brosh chronicles her adventures with cleaning, dogs, and depression through a crudely drawn pink stick figure with a strange yellow triangle atop her head. The triangle is supposed to be a ponytail, but it is open to interpretation. read more…

  • dateMarch 16, 2015
  • comments1
  • posted byColeman Nye
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