Tag Archives: Lindsay A. Bell

Podcast Pedagogy

This is the second in a two-part post in which Lindsay A. Bell (SUNY Oswego) describes her attempt to organize a senior seminar course around producing a podcast based on student research. As a Canadian, she teaches the course “Life in America: Ethnography & Everyday Experience in the United States and at Its Borders” with sincere curiosity. read more…

  • dateJune 1, 2016
  • commentsNo comments
  • posted byLindsay A. Bell
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Life in America

This is the first in a two-part post in which Lindsay A. Bell (SUNY Oswego) describes her attempt to organize a senior seminar course around producing a podcast based on student research. As a Canadian, she teaches the course “Life in America: Ethnography & Everyday Experience in the United States and at Its Borders” with sincere curiosity. read more…

  • dateMay 3, 2016
  • comments2
  • posted byLindsay A. Bell
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We’re celebrating our first anniversary!

A blog is only as good as the community it supports, so we want to thank our community members for their enthusiastic participation in our first year. You’ve made this endeavor an incredibly rewarding experience. Here’s hoping that the second year will prove to be as much fun! read more…

  • dateNovember 15, 2013
  • comments2
  • posted byAnne
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Five Simple Steps for Helping Students Write Ethnographic Papers

In my last post, I made the case for having students attempt ethnographic papers in courses other than “methods.” By introducing early undergraduates to the pleasures of ethnography, I think we showcase anthropology’s strong suit, but more importantly, I think it is a great way to scaffold them into ways of writing and reading that will serve them well in both the social sciences and the humanities. In this second post, I share the steps I go through to squeeze an ethnographic experience into what are admittedly short, one-term courses (12 weeks). read more…

  • dateSeptember 11, 2013
  • commentsNo comments
  • posted byLindsay A. Bell
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Teaching Culture and Methods to Novice/Non-Anthropologists

Ashley, an eager undergraduate student, arrived to my office exasperated. “My fieldwork isn’t about, like, anything! I must have, like, totally done it wrong.” Ashley had spent the afternoon observing interactions in the waiting room one of Toronto’s upscale tattoo parlours. Her visit was part of an assignment in my second-year linguistic anthropology course, “Culture and Communication.” Introducing undergraduates to ethnographic methods and writing is a highlight of our discipline… read more…

  • dateSeptember 5, 2013
  • comments3
  • posted byLindsay A. Bell
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